best dating sites for middle aged document State of the market survey 2 ABSTRACT, Revolution Consulting, March 2016

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ICHA 16 State of the Market ABSTRACT MAR 16.docx

This abstract provides details of a survey conducted for Independent Children's Home Association which claims that placement fees paid by local authorities to children’s homes providers must be increased if the sector is to cope with rising costs.

source link pdf STAYING PUT | 'Staying Put' for young people in residential care: A scoping exercise, National Children's Bureau, December 2014

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NCB 14 Staying Put A scoping exercise DEC 14.pdf

This collaborative report explores options for providing an equivalent of staying put for young people in residential care and the potential challenges and costs that will need to be taken into account for effective implementation. The Children and Families Act 2014 amended the Children Act 1989 so that local authorities now have a statutory duty to ‘monitor and support’ staying put arrangements for young people in foster care up to the age of 21, or until the young person stops living in the household before then. This report is solely concerned with delivering an equivalent level of support for young people who happen to be in residential care when they turn 18. It is not intended to set out the full range of support that young people leaving care need in their preparation for adulthood and independence.

enter pdf WORKFORCE | A census of the children's homes workforce, Department for Education, January 2015

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DfE 15 A census of the children's homes workforce JAN 15.pdf

This census was the first of its kind and was carried out to capture a snapshot of the children’s homes sector in 2013. The findings about the pay, qualifications and training of the workforce will be used to inform the Department for Education’s children’s home reform programme. Key points include: The level of staff meeting qualifications set out in regulation was generally positive across the sector. Managers reported that 80% of staff held a Level 3 qualification or higher and 12% were working towards the Level 3 Diploma; Overall, managers reported that only 1% of staff were being paid at or below the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and 11% of staff were being paid less than the Living Wage Rate (LWR); Recruitment of new staff across the sector seems to be of concern to managers, with over half of all managers (54%) saying that they find it difficult to recruit; Career pathways into and out of children’s homes seemed to be broadly similar. Staff primarily come from other children’s homes (29%) and leave to go to another children’s home (44%); There were some significant differences between local authority and privately run homes. Local authority run homes tended to have a larger number of places than privately run homes, but occupancy rates were similar between the two types of home. Reflecting this, local authority run homes tended to have a higher number of staff on average (15) compared to privately run homes (11). Privately run homes paid less per hour than local authority homes, with an average of £9.39 per hour in privately run homes against £13.28 in local authority run homes.

get link pdf WORKFORCE | Changing residential child care: A systems approach to consultation training and development, Johnnie Gibson et al, 2004

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CCIP 04 ABSTRACT Changing residential child care OCT 04.pdf

follow url pdf WORKFORCE | Residential child care workers inter-authority practice learning exchange, CELCIS, October 2015

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CEL 15 Resi child care workers inter authority practice learning exchange OCT 15.pdf

Residential child care staff from Shetland and Falkirk Councils spent time at each other's workplace in a learning exchange project, supported by CELCIS. At relatively low-cost to the sector, this approach shared learning and residential child care staff were supported through professional networks, based on a mutual learning experience. This evaluation details the challenges, learning and benefits of the project.

http://wolontariatsportowy.com/fioepr/bioepr/7085 document WORKFORCE | Supporting resilience in residential care staff: Practice paper ABSTRACT, Children's Homes Quality Standards Partnership, November 2015

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CHQSP 15 Practice paer 11 ABSTRACT NOV 15.docx

This abstract provides details of a practice paper which gives advice on building a resilience culture, managing for resilience, building team resilience and dealing with individual negativity.

follow link pdf WORKFORCE | Training and developing staff in children's homes, Department for Education, January 2015

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DfE 15 Training & developing staff in children's homes JAN 15.pdf

This research reports on findings from case studies carried out in a sample of 20 children’s homes between December 2013 and April 2014. The research has generated a number of guiding principles that might underpin the development of any future training and qualifications for staff working in children’s homes. These include: Good development and training is not just about the acquisition of knowledge, procedures and policy, but about how that knowledge can be applied, and used to nurture the personal skills and attributes of a well-rounded worker; There is a need for the sector to work with government to develop some kind of training programme or strategy that sets out flexible training pathways for staff working in children’s homes; If a new qualification is to be developed, it needs to be aligned with the wide array of training that is currently provided in children’s homes; Training is more likely to be of value if it is rooted in the practice of staff and needs of the young people they are caring for; Due to the specialist nature of this kind of work, an external course or qualification needs to be tailored to working with looked-after children and residential children’s care; Training needs to be delivered by people who have knowledge about working in the sector and can apply and adapt the course content to the particular needs of different children’s homes.

http://www.jogadores.pt/?efioped=mujer-busca-hombre-encarnacion&6c9=0b pdf Working with challenging and disruptive situations in residential child care: Sharing Effective Practice, Knowledge Review 22, SCIE, September 2008

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SCIE 08 Working with challenging and disruptive situations in residential child care SEP 08.pdf

This knowledge review examines a particular aspect of keeping children safe and promoting their well-being by managing challenging and disruptive situations.

click here pdf YOUNG PEOPLE'S GUIDE | Your guide to living in residential care, EPIC (Empowering People In Care), 2010

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EPIC 10 Your guide to living in residential care 2010.pdf

This guide aims to inform young people living in residential care about the different policies in place in their residential centre and help them to understand, WHEN, HOW and WHY certain decisions are made about their care.

follow link pdf YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS | It's not a unit, It's my home VOYPIC NEWS, February 2013

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VOY 13 Special edition newsletter Review of minimum standards in children's homes in NI FEB 13.pdf

Special edition of VOYPIC NEWS detailing what young people living in children's homes said would make the best children's home.

http://battunga.com.au/?giopere=imparare-option-trade&a4e=57 pdf YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS | Learning from experience, Voices from Care Cymru, June 2010

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VFCC 10 Learning from experience Executive Summary JUN 10.pdf

This is an executive summary of a qualitative study of the life histories and experiences of 16 young people who had spent significant periods of their life in the care of local authorities living in Wales was undertaken with Cardiff University.  Young people were asked to look back on their lives in care, at critical and key turning points, reflecting on what helped and what didn’t help and asked about their key messages, in order to inform future policy and practice.

source link pdf YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS | Life in children's homes: A report of children's experience, OFSTED, 2009

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OFS 09 Life in childrens homes 2009.pdf

Conducted by the Children's Rights Director.

pdf YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS | Strategy for children's residential care consultation with children and young people, Who Cares? Scotland, 8 February 2013

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WCS 13 Strategy for children's residential care consultation 8 Feb 13.pdf

As part of Scotland Excel’s consultation on proposals for a Residential Child Care Strategy, Who Cares? Scotland, were commissioned to find out what young people’s experiences were, of the services they were receiving. Children and young people feel they benefit from their residential care experience, citing a range of areas in which they feel they have improved.

pdf YOUNG PEOPLE'S VIEWS | What makes a good children's home? The Children's List, Children's Rights Director, December 2013

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CRD 13 Changing Childrens Homes GOOD Homes criteria DEC 13.pdf

As part of the children's views report Changing Children's Homes, children were asked what criteria makes a children's home into a good children's home. 

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